IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 610: Religious Nonconformism, II: Inquisitors' Manuscripts - Genesis and Use

Tuesday 7 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Department for the Study of Religions, Masaryk University, Brno
Organiser:David Zbíral, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair:Jennifer Kolpacoff Deane, Division of Social Science, University of Minnesota, Morris
Paper 610-aDrinking from Different Springs: Ecclesiastical Erudition and Inquisitorial Practice in Anselm of Alessandria's Tractatus de Hereticis
(Language: English)
Luca Fois, Independent Scholar, Robbiate
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 610-bThe Inquisitor's Thumbprint: The Evolution of an Early 14th-Century Florentine Inquisitors' Manual (Biblioteca Casanatense, MS 1730)
(Language: English)
Jill Moore, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 610-cWhy Bernard Gui's Practica Inquisitionis Hereticæ Pravitatis Should be Read in Manuscript at Least Once…: Bibliothèque Municipale de Toulouse, MS 387
(Language: English)
Derek Hill, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Abstract

This session inquires into what manuscripts read, owned and/or written by medieval inquisitors can tell us about the use of these objects and about an inquisitor’s work, habits, personality, and intentions, as well as about the genesis of an inquisitorial text. The papers will address three different cases: the first will track the sources and the editing process of the Tractatus de hereticis by Anselm of Alessandria; the second will focus on the evolution and use of an early 14th-century Florentine inquisition manual preserved in Biblioteca Casanatense, MS 1730; and the third will inquire into the Practica inquisitionis by Bernard Gui in Bibliothèque Municipale de Toulouse, MS 387, in order to shed more light on the author’s intentions, as well as his expectations regarding the readership and the use of this manual.