IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 625: Power & Institutions in Medieval Islam & Christendom (PIMIC), II: Comparative Approaches to Historiography in Medieval Christendom and Islam

Tuesday 7 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Power & Institutions in Medieval Islam & Christendom (PIMIC), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Madrid
Organiser:Cory Hitt, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Moderator/Chair:Attilio Stella, Department of History, Tel Aviv University / Power & Institutions in Medieval Islam & Christendom, Spain
Paper 625-aSultan: An Islamic Political Institution in the 10th Century?
(Language: English)
Hugh Kennedy, Department of the Languages & Cultures of the Near & Middle East, School of Oriental & African Studies, University of London
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 625-bTransmission of Social Ideals in L'Histoire de Guillaume le Maréchal
(Language: English)
Cory Hitt, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Law
Paper 625-cArdashir Doesn't Live Here Any More: Persian Theory and Arabian Practice at the Early Islamic Court
(Language: English)
Ian D. Morris, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Abstract

The papers in this session will explore historiography across the Islamic and Anglo-Norman worlds. Morris argues that political and doctrinal pressures on early Islamic historiography have distorted our picture of the Umayyad royal court, obscuring its Arabian roots. Hitt will examine the transmission of social norms and ideals within L’Histoire de Guillaume le Maréchal, a 13th-century biography of William Marshal, an exemplar knight and courtier. Kennedy will ask whether the sultan could be considered an Islamic political institution in the 10th century. These papers will consider the conclusions that can be drawn from comparatively examining historiographical sources across Islam and Christendom.