IMC 2015: Sessions

Session 636: Pilgrimage, IV: The Holy Land

Tuesday 7 July 2015, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Lancaster University
Organisers:Philip Booth, Department of History, Lancaster University
Adrian Cornell du Houx, Department of History, Lancaster University
Moderator/Chair:Jan Vandeburie, Warburg Institute, University of London
Paper 636-aBiblical Exegesis and the Origins of the Great Pilgrimage of 1064
(Language: English)
Paul Hayward, Department of History, Lancaster University
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Religious Life
Paper 636-bA Pilgrim's Prologue: Examining Motivations for Pilgrimage and the Writing of Pilgrimage Accounts in the Holy Land Pilgrimage Account of Thietmar, 1217-1218
(Language: English)
Philip Booth, Department of History, Lancaster University
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Latin, Religious Life
Paper 636-cLarvatus Prodeo: Disguised Pilgrims in the Late Medieval Period
(Language: English)
Beatrice Saletti, Dipartimento di Storia e Tutela dei Beni Culturali, Università degli Studi di Udine
Index terms: Crusades, Religious Life, Social History
Abstract

This session investigates the devotional activities of Holy Land pilgrims during the Middle Ages and the motivations behind these activities. Paul Hayward’s paper will discuss how dissemination of the millenarian beliefs that motivated the Great Pilgrimage of 1064 helped to shape its organisers’ thinking, drawing attention to hitherto unnoticed evidence of Christian von Stablo’s Commentary of the Book of Matthew, even though its author had been trying to deflate such beliefs. Philip Booth’s paper will focus on a prologus of a single Holy Land pilgrimage text of the early 13th-century, that of Thietmar, in order to discern what motivated the pilgrim to go on pilgrimage, but also what motivated him to preserve the memory of his pilgrimage textually. Beatrice Saletti’s paper will address the disguises of late medieval pilgrims. It will look at their reasons for visiting the Holy Land in disguise, and whether these reasons are political, economic, or due to fears regarding security.