IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1014: From Cooking Pot to Melting Pot: Archaeologies of Food and Identity in the Early Middle Ages

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Department of Archaeology, University of York
Organiser:Steven Ashby, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Moderator/Chair:Oliver E. Craig, Department of Archaeology / BioArCh, University of York
Paper 1014-aFood, Lifestyle, and Identity in the Kingdom of Mercia: An Integrated Archaeobiological Approach
(Language: English)
Anita Radini, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Anita Radini, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Science
Paper 1014-bPutting Flesh on the Bones: Zooarchaeology, Food, and Social Identity in Early Medieval England
(Language: English)
Kristopher Poole, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Kristopher Poole, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Science
Paper 1014-cNew Forms, New Foods?: Investigating Changes in Ceramic Vessel Form in the 9th and 10th Centuries
(Language: English)
Gareth Perry, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Gareth Perry, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Daily Life
Abstract

Food creates identities. Though the recent ‘food studies’ renaissance has hardly impacted archaeology, the latter has much to offer the former. Animal/plant remains have long informed our knowledge of early medieval diet, but have proven difficult to associate with objects, art, and text, precluding insight into the social technologies of cooking and eating. We have recently received AHRC funding for a scientifically informed investigation of the role of food technologies in forging social relationships in Viking Age England. This session will discuss the theme on a broad canvas: culinary innovation, the impact of migration, urbanisation, and commercial expansion, and the relationship between food, local politics, religion, and identity.