IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1034: Societas, communitas, yconomia: Conceptualising the Political in 12th-Century Latin Europe

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Societas Latina Daniae
Organiser:Mia Münster-Swendsen, Institut for Kommunikation og Humanistisk Videnskab, Roskilde Universitet
Moderator/Chair:Michael H. Gelting, Centre for Scandinavian Studies King's College University of Aberdeen 24 High Street OLD ABERDEEN AB24 3EB
Paper 1034-aPublic Duties and Personal Connections in Medieval Denmark
(Language: English)
Lars Kjær, Department of History, New College of the Humanities, London
Lars Kjær, Department of History, New College of the Humanities, London
Index terms: Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1034-bA Dwarf on the Shoulders of a Giant: Sven Aggesen and Ciceronian Ideas About Human Society
(Language: English)
Tue Emil Öhler Søvsø, Saxo-Instituttet, Københavns Universitet
Tue Emil Öhler Søvsø, Saxo-Instituttet, Københavns Universitet
Index terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Philosophy, Political Thought, Rhetoric
Paper 1034-cDistributing Power: Yconomia as a Political and Theological Concept around 1200
(Language: English)
Mia Münster-Swendsen, Institut for Kommunikation og Humanistisk Videnskab, Roskilde Universitet
Mia Münster-Swendsen, Institut for Kommunikation og Humanistisk Videnskab, Roskilde Universitet
Index terms: Canon Law, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Political Thought, Theology
Abstract

How did medieval thinkers conceive of the social and political order of their society, how did they envisage power structures and principles that should undergird social justice? The three papers in this session aim to re-examine a cluster of ideas and concepts regarding public duty, administrative office, accountability, rights of dispensation, naturalistic conceptions of human society and the theoretical framework concerning the distribution of political power. Together, the papers are based upon the contention, that the ‘primitivist’ notion of medieval political power as being thoroughly embedded in personal face-to-face relations remains inadequate to explain the complexity of the ‘political’ in a society consisting of a plurality of powers and societates.