IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1036: Culture and Conflict, I: Writing War

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organisers:Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Iason-Eleftherios Tzouriadis, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Alan V. Murray, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1036-aDivine Will, Human Agency, and Roman Ideals of War According to the Chronicon de Lanercost and Geoffrey le Baker's Chronicon
(Language: English)
Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Military History, Philosophy, Rhetoric
Paper 1036-bHow Far Did John Barbour's Bruce (c. 1375) Reflect Ideas Concerning The Waging of War Expressed in Vegetius' Epitoma rei militaris?
(Language: English)
Christopher Allmand, School of History, University of Liverpool
Christopher Allmand, School of History, University of Liverpool
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Other, Military History, Rhetoric
Paper 1036-cThe Changing Faces of Warfare: The Depiction of Arthurian Warfare in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae and the Alliterative Morte Arthur
(Language: English)
Craig M. Nakashian, Department of History, Texas A&M University, Texarkana
Craig M. Nakashian, Department of History, Texas A&M University, Texarkana
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - Latin, Military History, Political Thought
Abstract

This session explores the influence of other texts and changing realities on high-late medieval English and Scottish writings on war. Mr Smith explores how Roman texts presented ethical ideals for Geoffrey le Baker and the anonymous Chronicon de Lanercost writing on the conflict between divine will and human agency. Professor Allmand shows how Vegetius’ Epitoma rei militaris informed Barbour’s presentation of war in The Bruce, especially when envisioning the role of the military leader. Dr Nakashian examines how Monmouth’s Historia Regum Britanniae and the anonymous Alliterative Morte Arthur present different figures of King Arthur which reflect the changing tensions in English kingship (e.g. violence, legitimate authority to wage war, and the societal costs) in the high and late Middle Ages.