IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1113: Cannibalism: Of Man Eating Men

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Centre of Archaeometry & Molecular Archaeology, Universität Salzburg / Interfaculty Department of Legal Medicine, Universität Salzburg / Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft
Organiser:Jan Cemper-Kiesslich, Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg
Moderator/Chair:Jan Cemper-Kiesslich, Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg
Paper 1113-aForensic Evaluation of Cannibalism
(Language: English)
Herwig Brandtner, Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg
Herwig Brandtner, Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg
Herwig Brandtner, Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg
Index terms: Anthropology, Medicine, Mentalities, Science
Paper 1113-bThe Magic of the Human Heart: Why Heart-Eaters Devour the Human Heart
(Language: English)
Christa Agnes Tuczay, Institut für Germanistik, Universität Wien
Christa Agnes Tuczay, Institut für Germanistik, Universität Wien
Christa Agnes Tuczay, Institut für Germanistik, Universität Wien
Index terms: Anthropology, Language and Literature - German, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Mentalities
Abstract

In this session we focus on cultural and physical anthropological aspects of cannibalism in medieval times. Beginning with a general overview on causes and motivations for anthropophagic practices as seen from a recent forensic point of view, followed by a historical evaluation of physical signs of cannibalism found on human remains, this session sets out to align forensic and anthropological data with historical traditions. The trans-disciplinary approach as outlined above appears to be a promising tool not only for cross-validation of the methodologies involved but also for potentially gaining new insights in past and recent phenomenology breaking a taboo.