IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 112: The Merovingian Kingdoms in Mediterranean Perspective, I: Imagining and Practising Religion

Monday 4 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:GIF-Project 'East and West in the Early Middle Ages - The Merovingian Kingdoms in Mediterranean Perspective', Freie Universität Berlin / Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva
Organisers:Pia Bockius, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Tamar Rotman, Department of General History, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Moderator/Chair:Yitzhak Hen, Department of History, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Paper 112-aMapping Divine Power: Saints from East and West in Gregory of Tours
(Language: English)
Pia Bockius, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Pia Bockius, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Hagiography, Mentalities, Religious Life
Paper 112-bMigration of Eastern Saints to Merovingian Gaul: A New Look at the Liber In Gloria Martyrum and the Martyrologium Hieronymianum
(Language: English)
Tamar Rotman, Department of General History, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Tamar Rotman, Department of General History, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Index terms: Hagiography, Religious Life
Paper 112-cCorresponding Agendas?: Some Thoughts on the Impact of the 'Three Chapters Controversy' in Merovingian Gaul
(Language: English)
Till Stüber, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Till Stüber, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy, Theology
Abstract

This is the first of three sessions exploring the Merovingian Kingdoms in a broader Mediterranean perspective and discussing different forms of exchange between East and West. This initial session focuses on religious aspects. Pia Bockius examines how Gregory of Tours uses his Liber In Gloria Martyrum to draw a landscape of divine power which includes both Eastern and Western saints as an integral part of the Mediterranean Christian community. Tamar Rotman seeks to explain the appearance of foreign martyrs in two Merovingian hagiographical texts, examining the migration of their stories and the extent of their veneration in Gaul. Till Stüber addresses the aspect of religious thought and discourse by focusing on the Church Council of Orléans (549 AD), and the Merovingian response to the ‘Three-Chapters Controversy’, a dispute that affected the entire Mediterranean region.