IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1126: Political Change and Metamorphosis of Cultural Landscape in Southern Italy

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Francesco Gangemi, Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Roma
Moderator/Chair:Maddalena Vaccaro, Dipartimento di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale (DISPAC), Università degli Studi di Salerno
Paper 1126-aNew Churches, New Saints?: Architectural and Iconic Change in Norman Italy in the 11th Century
(Language: English)
Oliver Becker, Independent Scholar, Bad Sachsa
Oliver Becker, Independent Scholar, Bad Sachsa
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Archives and Sources, Geography and Settlement Studies, Hagiography
Paper 1126-bNorman Architecture for Norman Monks?: The First Benedictine Foundations in the County of Sicily
(Language: English)
Margherita Tabanelli, Dipartimento di Storia dell'arte e Spettacolo, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza'
Margherita Tabanelli, Dipartimento di Storia dell'arte e Spettacolo, Università degli Studi di Roma 'La Sapienza'
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Sculpture, Monasticism, Political Thought
Paper 1126-cFrom Kingdom to Empire: Reshaping the Apulian Landscape and Built Environment Under Frederick II
(Language: English)
Francesco Gangemi, Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Roma
Francesco Gangemi, Bibliotheca Hertziana, Max-Planck-Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Roma
Index terms: Administration, Architecture - Secular, Geography and Settlement Studies, Political Thought
Abstract

Southern Italy is an extremely complex territory with a multitude of social, institutional, and therefore artistic landscapes. During the Norman-Staufer age, the area underwent a dramatic political change, which was reflected by transformations of monuments and entire territories.
This session will trace such metamorphosis, and investigate the relationship between historical events, political environment, and material culture. Through the use of primary sources, both documentary and visual, it will engage new debates on Southern Italian contexts, and connect the Mediterranean area with other European regions.