IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1128: Voicing Dissent in Late Medieval Political Culture

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:W. H. Oliver Humanities Research Academy, Massey University
Organiser:E. Amanda McVitty, School of Humanities, Massey University, New Zealand
Moderator/Chair:Gwilym Dodd, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Paper 1128-aPublic Opinion in Late Medieval English Towns: An Anachronistic Concept?
(Language: English)
Christian Liddy, Department of History, Durham University
Christian Liddy, Department of History, Durham University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1128-bThe Language and Landscape of Political Protest
(Language: English)
E. Amanda McVitty, School of Humanities, Massey University, New Zealand
E. Amanda McVitty, School of Humanities, Massey University, New Zealand
Index terms: Law, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1128-cBy Common Consent?: The Involvement of Craftsmen in Urban Politics in 15th-Century Liège
(Language: English)
Ben Eersels, Faculteit Letteren, KU Leuven
Ben Eersels, Faculteit Letteren, KU Leuven
Index terms: Economics - Urban, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1128-dNon-Verbal Dissent in Late Medieval Urban Culture
(Language: English)
Pablo González Martin, Wadham College, University of Oxford
Pablo González Martin, Wadham College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Mentalities, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Abstract

This session brings together recent research into the discourses and practices of dissent, and the spatial and performative dimensions of political culture. Our aim is to explore useful categories of analysis for thinking about how, where, to whom, and in what rhetorical and linguistic terms grievances were expressed in late medieval popular politics. Framed in the context of an expanding urban public sphere, we consider how informal and unsanctioned modes of political speech such as public bill casting, libels, and popular petitioning were shaped by, and interacted with formal legal and political discourses of response and redress.