IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1129: Confession in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Network for the Study of Late Antique & Early Medieval Monasticism
Organiser:Albrecht Diem, Department of History, Syracuse University, New York
Moderator/Chair:Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 1129-aSelf-Disclosure in the Eastern Monastic Tradition in Late Antiquity
(Language: English)
Inbar Graiver, Department of History, Tel Aviv University
Inbar Graiver, Department of History, Tel Aviv University
Inbar Graiver, Department of History, Tel Aviv University
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 1129-bConfessional Practice as Pedagogy in Early Medieval Iberian Rules
(Language: English)
Jamie Wood, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Jamie Wood, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Jamie Wood, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life, Theology
Paper 1129-c'[...] because confession and penance free from death': Confession as Ascetic Practice and as Pastoral Tool
(Language: English)
Albrecht Diem, Department of History, Syracuse University, New York
Albrecht Diem, Department of History, Syracuse University, New York
Albrecht Diem, Department of History, Syracuse University, New York
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life, Theology
Abstract

This session explores the breaking points in the development of confessional practices in the late antique and early medieval monastic world. Inbar Graiver presents on late antique monastic practice of exagoreusis, a practice of disclosing the self that formed a systematic attempt to discriminate between pure and impure thoughts and desires. Jamie Wood investigates the confessional practices in Iberian monastic texts of the sixth and seventh centuries (Leande and Isidore of Seville, Fructuosus of Braga, Valerius of Bierzo). Albrecht Diem describes the transformation of confession from an ascetic practice to a tool to attain salvation and an instrument of pastoral care on the basis of sources related to the Columbanian monastic movement.