IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1136: Culture and Conflict, II: Imagining Weapons

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organisers:Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Iason-Eleftherios Tzouriadis, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Joanna Phillips, School of Law, University of Leeds
Paper 1136-aThe Word in the Sword: Towards an Understanding of the Inscribing of Medieval Blades
(Language: English)
Robert W. Jones, Advanced Studies in England, Franklin & Marshall College, Pennsylvania
Robert W. Jones, Advanced Studies in England, Franklin & Marshall College, Pennsylvania
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Mentalities, Military History
Paper 1136-bUnfamiliar Objects in Medieval German Literature: Military Objects between History and Fiction
(Language: English)
Romana Kaske, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Romana Kaske, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Crusades, Language and Literature - German, Military History
Paper 1136-cThe Image of the Soldier and His Equipment in Art: Changes and Perception, 1450-1550
(Language: English)
Iason-Eleftherios Tzouriadis, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Iason-Eleftherios Tzouriadis, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Art History - General, Military History
Abstract

This session explores the meaning of weapons as manifested in material, visual, and written culture of the high-late Middle Ages. Dr Jones offers some thoughts on the different and changing motives for the working of words, phrases, letters, and symbols into swords. Ms Kaske examines how narratives relate fictional to real historical objects, creating objects whose meaning oscillates between the familiar and unfamiliar, thereby affecting their meaning. Mr Tzouriadis tracks changes in the visual depiction of soldiers and their equipment in relation to evolving conduct of warfare, and thereby shows changing perception behind technical features of soldiers.