IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 119: Medieval(ist) Fictions of the North: Telling Stories and Writing History

Monday 4 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:Victoria Cooper, School of English, University of Leeds
Timothy Rowbotham, Centre for Medieval Studies / Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Catalin Taranu, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Alaric Hall, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki
Paper 119-a'Truth' in Medievalist Fantasy: Interplay between History and Fiction in Videogames
(Language: English)
Victoria Cooper, School of English, University of Leeds
Victoria Cooper, School of English, University of Leeds
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 119-bKings, Fools, and False Dichotomies: History and Folktale in Gautreks saga
(Language: English)
Timothy Rowbotham, Centre for Medieval Studies / Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Timothy Rowbotham, Centre for Medieval Studies / Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Literacy and Orality
Paper 119-cThe Many Battles of Maldon: How Does an Event Become History?
(Language: English)
Catalin Taranu, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Catalin Taranu, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Military History
Abstract

The borders between histories and fictions are just as porous and elusive today as they were in the Middle Ages, frustrating our scholarly expectations of clean-cut categories. The three papers explore the interplay between fiction, story-telling, historical remembrance and imagination in Old Norse fornaldarsögur, Old English heroic poems, and modern-day video games. All these discourses are proven to function both as histories and fictions, and story-telling is shown to be the privileged medium of thinking about the past. The papers discover spaces of history-making in the encounters between the Anglo-Saxon and Viking worlds, modern and medieval media, event and imagination.