IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 120: Islamic Foodways in the Multi-Faith Societies of Iberia and Sicily: Archaeological Approaches

Monday 4 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:University of York
Organiser:Michelle Alexander, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Moderator/Chair:Iona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Paper 120-aZooarchaeological Insights into Social Change and Food Practices during the Early Islamic Period in Iberia
(Language: English)
Marcos García-García, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Universidad de Granada
Marcos García-García, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Universidad de Granada
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Economics - General, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 120-bDiet, Husbandry, and Religion: A Zooarchaelogical Approach to Animal Exploitation in Islamic Sicily
(Language: English)
Veronica Aniceti, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Veronica Aniceti, Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Economics - General, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 120-cIslamic and Christian Diet in the Multi-Faith Society of Medieval Portugal: A Stable Isotope Approach
(Language: English)
Alice Toso, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Alice Toso, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Index terms: Anthropology, Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 120-dIslamic Diet in Medieval Aragon: The Evidence from Stable Isotopes
(Language: English)
Michelle Alexander, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Michelle Alexander, Department of Archaeology, University of York
Index terms: Anthropology, Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Islamic and Arabic Studies
Abstract

The Islamic conquests of Iberia and Sicily leading to the coexistence of Muslims, Christians, and Jews had a profound effect on society and culture. Diet and foodways, being inextricably linked to identity, faith, and social status, offer an informative window onto these pluralistic societies. This session showcases the original contribution archaeology is making to the study of Islamic diet and economies in these regions. Papers will focus on four areas of what are now Spain, Portugal, and Sicily, exploring geographical, social, and chronological variation through the study of animal bones and human remains.