IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1208: Cross-Cultural Studies of the Book in the Global Middle Ages, I: Books across Boundaries

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), University of Birmingham / Program in Medieval Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Organisers:Arezou Azad, School of History & Cultures, University of Birmingham
William Purkis, Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages (CeSMA), University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair:Paula Carns, Literature & Languages Library, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Paper 1208-aReading Cultures in the 9th Century: Arab, Byzantine, Carolingian
(Language: English)
Leslie Brubaker, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies / Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Leslie Brubaker, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies / Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1208-bCultural Encounters of the Arabic Book
(Language: English)
Neelam Hussain, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Neelam Hussain, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Language and Literature - Comparative, Science
Paper 1208-cA Sum of Its Parts: The Medieval Persian Book
(Language: English)
Arezou Azad, School of History & Cultures, University of Birmingham
Arezou Azad, School of History & Cultures, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This strand of two sessions will compare and contrast studies of the book across cultures in the global Middle Ages. The first session, ‘Books across Boundaries’, will address how, why and with what consequences books travelled across cultural boundaries during the medieval period. The three papers will consider books as gifts, commodities, and carriers of knowledge and culture in relation to trade, war and migration, and reflect critically on the methods and evidence for research of these topics.