IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1210: The Crusades in France, Occitania, and Norman Italy: Roots, Impact, and Cultural Significance

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Project 'Crusades in France & Occitania'
Organiser:Thomas Lecaque, Department of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Moderator/Chair:Simon Thomas Parsons, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Paper 1210-aHugh of Troyes and the Impact of the First Crusade
(Language: English)
James Doherty, School of Modern Languages, University of Bristol
James Doherty, School of Modern Languages, University of Bristol
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Crusades, Lay Piety, Mentalities
Paper 1210-bSome Thoughts and Reflections about a Missed Opportunity: Norman Italy and the Holy Land, 11th-12th Centuries
(Language: English)
Luigi Russo, Dipartimento di Scienza Storiche, Università Europea di Roma
Luigi Russo, Dipartimento di Scienza Storiche, Università Europea di Roma
Index terms: Crusades, Lay Piety, Mentalities, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1210-cRobert of Bellême, Rotrou of Perche, and Norman Participation on the First Crusade: New Evidence from the Old French Tradition
(Language: English)
Simon Thomas Parsons, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Simon Thomas Parsons, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Abstract

This session, organized and co-ordinated by the international project ‘The Crusades in France and Occitania’ (cfoproject.org), seeks to explore the roots, origin, and impact of the crusading movement in the French and Occitanian worlds, broadly considered. These approaches characterize a new understanding of the direction in crusading studies, now ascendant, which moves away from isolated case studies of the importance of the crusade solely from a ‘crusading/crusader states’ perspective to consider these expeditions, movements, and preaching events in medieval European geopolitical and cultural context. In keeping with this year’s theme of ‘food’, these three papers are focused on how the crusading movement was ‘fed’ by traditions of participation in elite culture.