IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1236: Culture and Conflict, III: Ideals and Waging War

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organisers:Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Iason-Eleftherios Tzouriadis, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Natalie Anderson, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1236-aStrategic and Tactical Changes in the Byzantine Cavalry of the 10th Century: Theory and Practice in the Battlefields of the East
(Language: English)
Georgios Theotokis, Department of History, Fatıh University, Istanbul
Georgios Theotokis, Department of History, Fatıh University, Istanbul
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Military History
Paper 1236-bThe Art of Fighting and War: Analysing Contexts of Application of the Martial Gesture as Codified in the Fight Books and Their Relation to Warfare
(Language: English)
Daniel Jaquet, Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin
Daniel Jaquet, Max-Planck-Institut für Wissenschaftsgeschichte, Berlin
Index terms: Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Military History
Paper 1236-cPicturing Siege Warfare: Siege Views and the Reconstruction of Early Gunpowder Fortifications
(Language: English)
Simon M. Pepper, School of Architecture, University of Liverpool
Simon M. Pepper, School of Architecture, University of Liverpool
Index terms: Architecture - Secular, Art History - General, Military History, Technology
Abstract

This session explores how ideals of war in manuals and visual depictions can reflect the reality of war in the high to late Middle Ages. Dr. Theotokis examines how the increasing study of military manuals and their ideals in tenth-century Byzantium contributed to significant changes in the conduct of cavalry warfare. Dr Jaquet analyses the goals, authorial projects, and intended audiences of late medieval ‘Fight Books’ to reassess the sociocultural development of the art of fighting. Professor Pepper reconstructs the lost transitional military architecture of the 15th and 16th centuries through scrutiny of the extant pictorial record.