IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1240: Anglo-Saxon Riddles and Wisdom, IV: Learned Content and Contacts

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:The Riddle Ages: An Anglo-Saxon Riddle Blog
Organisers:Megan Cavell, Department of English, Durham University
Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Megan Cavell, Department of English, Durham University
Paper 1240-aSorting out the Rings: Astronomical Tropes in Exeter Book Riddle 4
(Language: English)
Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
Jennifer Neville, Department of English, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Science
Paper 1240-bWhen is an Anglo-Saxon Riddle Not a Riddle?: Cracking the Enigma Code
(Language: English)
Andy Orchard, Pembroke College, University of Oxford
Andy Orchard, Pembroke College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 1240-cHow Far Did the Influence of Anglo-Saxon Riddling Reach the Continent?
(Language: English)
Mercedes Salvador-Bello, Departamento de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana, Universidad de Sevilla
Mercedes Salvador-Bello, Departamento de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana, Universidad de Sevilla
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin
Abstract

The papers in Session IV explore the place of riddles within the wider knowledge economy of the early medieval world. Thus, Neville discusses the representation of cosmological information in Exeter Book Riddle 4; Orchard pushes the limits of riddling as a genre through analysis of both Old English and Anglo-Latin texts; and Salvador-Bello examines just how far that genre’s influence reached in her discussion of Anglo-Saxon riddle manuscripts on the continent.