IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 130: Crossing Borders in the Insular Middle Ages, I: Romance and History

Monday 4 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Crossing Borders in the Insular Middle Ages
Organiser:Victoria Flood, Department of English Studies, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Aisling Byrne, School of Literature & Languages, University of Reading
Paper 130-aNationalist Versions of the Trojan Legend in Transnational Europe
(Language: English)
Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol
Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 130-bRomancing the North
(Language: English)
Sarah Baccianti, Faculté des lettres, Université de Lausanne
Sarah Baccianti, Faculté des lettres, Université de Lausanne
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Latin, Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 130-cBooks without Borders: Anglo-French Influences on Older Scots Romance
(Language: English)
Ruth Caddick, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Ruth Caddick, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - French or Occitan
Abstract

This session, sponsored by the ‘Crossing Borders in the Insular Middle Ages’ research group, considers the transmission and translation of romances and historical texts across medieval Britain, Ireland, Iceland, and Scandinavia. Representative of an emerging area of comparative insular literary studies, papers consider the movement of the romance of Troy across Europe to Britain and Ireland, and its vernacular re-imaginings; the translation of French and English romances into Middle Scots; and the Norse translations of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain, and the legends of Alexander. Speakers explore the localised appeal of pan-European narratives, and pose new questions about the relationship between literature, language, and geo-political identities.