IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1336: Culture and Conflict, IV: The Wars of Edward III

Wednesday 6 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organisers:Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Iason-Eleftherios Tzouriadis, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Trevor Russell Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1336-aTechnology, Manpower, and the Matter of England: Revisiting Edward III's Early Strategic Thought
(Language: English)
Daniel Franke, Department of History, Marist College / State University of New York, New Paltz
Daniel Franke, Department of History, Marist College / State University of New York, New Paltz
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Mentalities, Military History
Paper 1336-bInfantry Discipline and English Martial Culture in Edward III's Wars
(Language: English)
Kelly DeVries, Department of History, Loyola College, Maryland / Royal Armouries, Leeds
Kelly DeVries, Department of History, Loyola College, Maryland / Royal Armouries, Leeds
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Mentalities, Military History
Paper 1336-cCrécy and the Memorialization of War
(Language: English)
Michael Livingston, Department of English, The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina
Michael Livingston, Department of English, The Citadel, Military College of South Carolina
Index terms: Military History, Social History
Abstract

This session reassesses the conduct of war under Edward III (r. 1327-77) in light of recent work and interdisciplinary approaches. Dr Franke examines the intersection of campaign goals and national identity with the influence of technology, manpower, and changing circumstances on Edward III’s and his advisors’ strategic thought. Professor DeVries shows the increasing prominence and efficacy of disciplined infantry and the societal impact on English martial culture. Professor Livingston examines the context of the early poetic responses to the battle of Crécy within the framework of medieval thought on the reliability of sources, thereby illustrating how such accounts of battle were deemed at the time to be more reliable than prose reports.