IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 135: Southern Italy in the Norman and Staufen Periods, I: Negotiating Power

Monday 4 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Daniel Siegmund, Independent Scholar, Leipzig
Moderator/Chair:Amy Devenney, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 135-a'Normanitas' and Lordship: Reassessing Norman Identity in the South
(Language: English)
Thomas Nitschke, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Thomas Nitschke, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 135-bThe Networks of Power of the South Italian Nobility in the 12th Century
(Language: English)
Hervin Fernández-Aceves, School of History, University of Leeds
Hervin Fernández-Aceves, School of History, University of Leeds
Index terms: Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 135-cThe Mosaic of Roger II in Santa Maria dell'Ammiraglio in Palermo: 'essentially a political manifesto'
(Language: English)
Benedikt Vornberger, Zentrum für Mittelalter- und Renaissancestudien, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Benedikt Vornberger, Zentrum für Mittelalter- und Renaissancestudien, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Index terms: Lay Piety, Liturgy, Religious Life
Abstract

Paper -a seeks to reassess historiographic texts from 11th-century Italy as agents in the establishment and consolidation of new polities in the South and highlights their potential value as sources to the internal socio-political structures of these realms. Paper -b explores the social re-structuring of the Norman aristocracy under the new Hauteville Monarchy, and how a new political game was created from the shifting interactions between the crown and the territorial nobility. Paper -c compares forms of religious representation of power in the second half of the 12th century, focusing on the one hand, on the Norman rulers William I, William II, and Tancred of Sicily and, on the other, on the emperors Fredrick I and Henry VI.