IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 138: The Experience of Slavery in the Medieval World, I: Domestic Slavery from Late Antiquity to the Early Renaissance

Monday 4 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Judith Evans-Grubbs, Department of History, Emory University
Moderator/Chair:Judith Evans-Grubbs, Department of History, Emory University
Paper 138-aThe Weak Slaveholder in the Sermons of Augustine of Hippo
(Language: English)
Cassandra Casias, Department of History, Emory University
Cassandra Casias, Department of History, Emory University
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Economics - General, Sermons and Preaching, Social History
Paper 138-bSlaves in the Family: The Relationship between Freeborn Boys and Slaves According to John Chrysostom's On Vainglory
(Language: English)
John W. Martens, Department of Theology, University of St Thomas, Minnesota
John W. Martens, Department of Theology, University of St Thomas, Minnesota
Index terms: Daily Life, Ecclesiastical History, Sermons and Preaching, Social History
Paper 138-cHrotsvit's Basilius, or How to Break a Demonic Carta, Legally!
(Language: English)
Sarah Bogue, Department of Religion / Pitts Theological Library, Emory University
Sarah Bogue, Department of Religion / Pitts Theological Library, Emory University
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Lay Piety, Social History
Paper 138-dWho's Your Daddy?: Slavery and Contested Patrimony in Florence
(Language: English)
Lynn Marie Laufenberg, Department of History, Sweet Briar College, Virginia
Lynn Marie Laufenberg, Department of History, Sweet Briar College, Virginia
Abstract

Most of the scholarship on slavery in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages has focused on issues like the ‘end of slavery’ or the dynamics of the slave trade in the Middle Ages, or the appearance of certain ethnic or religious groups who could (or could not) be enslaved. This panel instead looks at the internal dynamics of slave-master relationships within the household, as seen in the sermons of Christian bishops (Casias and Martens), hagiographic literature (Bogue), and legal disputes of late medieval/early modern Florence (Laufenberg).