IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1503: Medieval Modern: The Use of the Medieval in Modern and Contemporary Arts

Thursday 7 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies (CLAMS), King's College London
Organiser:Francesca Brooks, Department of English, King's College London
Moderator/Chair:Meg Boulton, Independent Scholar
Paper 1503-aTracing a Creative Network of the Old English Seafarer Poem in the 20th and 21st Centuries
(Language: English)
Fran Allfrey, Department of English / Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King's College London
Fran Allfrey, Department of English / Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King's College London
Fran Allfrey, Department of English / Centre for Late Antique & Medieval Studies, King's College London
Index terms: Art History - General, Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Performance Arts - General
Paper 1503-bMultilingual and Multimedia Passion Narratives: David Jones's 'Dream of the Rood' Inscription in The Anathemata
(Language: English)
Francesca Brooks, Department of English, King's College London
Francesca Brooks, Department of English, King's College London
Francesca Brooks, Department of English, King's College London
Index terms: Art History - General, Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Printing History
Paper 1503-cFair Field: A Radical Re-Imagining of Piers Plowman across Theatre, Digital Art, and Site-Specific Performance
(Language: English)
Tom Chivers, Penned in the Margins, London
Tom Chivers, Penned in the Margins, London
Tom Chivers, Penned in the Margins, London
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism, Performance Arts - General, Technology
Abstract

‘We are in a position now to see that encounters with medieval art mark the whole history of modernism and its aftermath.’ – Medieval Modern: Art Out of Time, Alexander Nagel. This session aims to explore some of the moments of collision in which modern and contemporary works, both visual and textual, interact with medieval materials: re-purposing them in the production of something new. From the perspective of researchers and poet-practitioners, the session will look at how these modern and contemporary re-workings might be seen as critical readings of the medieval, and will question how this might change our perception of these materials.