IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1609: Religious Miscellanies, II: The Transmission of Ideas

Thursday 7 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Project 'Literacy for All', University of Hull / Project 'Cities of Readers', Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Organiser:Johanneke Uphoff, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Moderator/Chair:Elisabeth Salter, Department of English, University of Hull
Paper 1609-aEnglish Women's Manuscript Miscellanies and the Female Culture of Religious Knowledge, 1500-1600
(Language: English)
Amanda Capern, Department of History, University of Hull
Amanda Capern, Department of History, University of Hull
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Printing History, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Paper 1609-bThe Tretyse of Love and the Impact of Early Print Culture
(Language: English)
Diana Denissen, Section d'anglais, Université de Lausanne
Diana Denissen, Section d'anglais, Université de Lausanne
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Printing History, Religious Life
Paper 1609-cThe Transmission of Ideas out of Scholarly and Ecclesiastical Communities into Popular Culture: The Case of Durham Cathedral, MS Hunter 15
(Language: English)
Sarah McKeon, Department of English, University of Hull
Sarah McKeon, Department of English, University of Hull
Index terms: Lay Piety, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 1609-dReligious Miscellanies and Lay Devotional Readership in the Late Medieval Low Countries
(Language: English)
Johanneke Uphoff, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Johanneke Uphoff, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Index terms: Lay Piety, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Abstract

One of three linked sessions on religious miscellanies. This session focuses on religious miscellanies as vehicles for the transmission of ideas. Capern discusses connections between manuscript and print culture and the transmission of religious knowledge in women’s religious miscellanies, 1500-1600. Denissen explores the role of print culture in the composition of The Tretyse of Love and on processes of miscellaneous compilation. McKeon analyses Durham Cathedral MS Hunter15 as a miscellany that synthesises and communicates scholarly ideas to a lay audience. Uphoff discusses late medieval miscellanies as evidence of active participation of lay people in religious textual culture.