IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1611: Stylus as a Paint Brush: Writing and Artistic Creation, 6th-9th Centuries, II

Thursday 7 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:'ICONOPHILIA': Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellowship 657240 / Horizon 2020 Framework Programme for Research & Innovation (2014-2020)
Organisers:Vincent Debiais, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Francesca Dell'Acqua, Dipartimento di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale, Università degli Studi di Salerno
Moderator/Chair:Francesca Dell'Acqua, Dipartimento di Scienze del Patrimonio Culturale, Università degli Studi di Salerno
Paper 1611-aSans l'ombre d'un doute: renifler la Maiestas Domini
(Language: Français)
Eric Palazzo, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers
Eric Palazzo, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers
Eric Palazzo, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers
Index terms: Art History - General, Language and Literature - Latin, Liturgy, Theology
Paper 1611-bDescriptions and Evocations of the Cross in Alcuinus's tituli
(Language: English)
Vincent Debiais, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Vincent Debiais, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Vincent Debiais, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers / Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index terms: Art History - General, Epigraphy, Language and Literature - Latin, Rhetoric
Abstract

The two sessions will explore: 1) the ability of late antique and medieval authors to create images throughout their written words, blurring the borders between visual and literary arts; 2) investigate how the written and oral dissemination of textual imagery interacted with the conception, production, and perception of visual arts in the same period. Using their stylus as a painting brush, late antique and medieval authors transformed words in literary images/icons, making them part of a wider visual culture. Works of art described or evoked might have existed, but, most of the time, textual imagery remained ‘literary works of art’ in a poetic space of creation, a fiction of shapes and colors, depicted or shaped under the readers’ eyes.