IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1620: Rome and After, II: Food for the Body, Food for the Soul

Thursday 7 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Moore Institute for Research in the Humanities & Social Studies, National University of Ireland, Galway
Organiser:Christopher Doyle, Department of History, National University of Ireland, Galway
Moderator/Chair:Adrastos Omissi, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Paper 1620-aEat Like an Emperor: Diet, Consumption, and the Rhetoric of Imperial Habits
(Language: English)
Rebecca Usherwood, Independent Scholar, London
Rebecca Usherwood, Independent Scholar, London
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Political Thought, Rhetoric
Paper 1620-bVinidarius and his Brevis pimentorum: The Transition from Roman to Medieval as Seen Through the Use of Spices and Seasoning
(Language: English)
Sally Grainger, Food Historian
Sally Grainger, Food Historian
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Social History
Paper 1620-cFood for the Soul?: The Excerpta Vinidarii and the Codex Salmasianus
(Language: English)
Christopher Grocock, Department of Classics, Bedales School, Petersfield
Christopher Grocock, Department of Classics, Bedales School, Petersfield
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance), Manuscripts and Palaeography, Social History
Abstract

Paper –a examines Claudius Mamertinus 362 panegyric for Emperor Julian, investigating how discussions of imperial diet and consumption could be used to articulate shifting concepts of ideal imperial behaviour and rule across the 4th century. Paper -b discusses the 5th-century text, the Apici excerpta a Vinidario viro inlustris, exploring the transition from Roman to Medieval food as seen through the use of spices and seasoning. Paper -c also concerns the Excerpta Vinidarii, a text constituting a remarkable and unique testimony to the popular tradition of ascribing culinary texts to the semi-mythical figure of ‘Apicius’. It examines the text’s Latinity and some of its palaeographical features shared by the Codex Salmasianus.