IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1629: Food and Feast in Late Antique and Early Byzantine Sardinia

Thursday 7 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Organiser:Rossana Martorelli, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Moderator/Chair:Alex Metcalfe, Department of History, Lancaster University
Paper 1629-aEarly Christian Feasts near Graves: Ordinary or Ritual Meals?
(Language: English)
Rossana Martorelli, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Rossana Martorelli, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Byzantine Studies, Daily Life, Religious Life
Paper 1629-bFood Trade, Feeding, and Standards of Living in 6th- and 7th-Century Sardinia: The Example of Donori's Lex portus
(Language: English)
Marco Muresu, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Marco Muresu, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Byzantine Studies, Economics - Trade, Epigraphy
Paper 1629-cSouth Sardinia within Routes of Food Transport in the Roman Period
(Language: English)
Laura Soro, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Laura Soro, Dipartimento di Storia, Beni culturali e Territorio, Università degli Studi di Cagliari
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Byzantine Studies, Economics - Trade, Maritime and Naval Studies
Abstract

The session focuses on food circulation in the island of Sardinia, from the Late Roman period to Late Antiquity and the early phases of its Byzantine domination. The first paper presents the evidence of daily life and the practice of ritual meals in cemeteries. A mirror of food and trade circulation comes from an epigraphical document: the so-called Lex portus, which will be presented by the second paper. The final paper will analyse the relations between trade and ports, thanks to the recent discoveries of marine archaeology.