IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1632: Language and Identity in the Roman de Perceforest

Thursday 7 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Brooke Heidenreich Findley, Department of French, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona
Moderator/Chair:Brooke Heidenreich Findley, Department of French, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona
Paper 1632-aLes dialogues politiques dans Perceforest
(Language: Français)
Corinne Denoyelle, Département Lettres et arts du spectacle, Université Stendhal-Grenoble 3
Corinne Denoyelle, Département Lettres et arts du spectacle, Université Stendhal-Grenoble 3
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Political Thought
Paper 1632-bLes pratiques de la ponctuation dans les versions manuscrites et imprimées du Roman de Perceforest
(Language: Français)
Huei-Chen Li, Department of French Language & Literature, National Central University, Taiwan
Huei-Chen Li, Department of French Language & Literature, National Central University, Taiwan
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1632-cServants of the Sovereign God: Widows and Religion in the Roman de Perceforest
(Language: English)
Marie-Christine Payne, Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Antiques et Médiévales, Université Paris III - Sorbonne Nouvelle
Marie-Christine Payne, Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches Antiques et Médiévales, Université Paris III - Sorbonne Nouvelle
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Women's Studies
Abstract

With a critical edition recently completed by Gilles Roussineau, and a new compressed English translation by Nigel Bryant, the massive late medieval Roman de Perceforest is finally beginning to receive the scholarly attention it deserves. This fantastically imaginative chronicle of pre-Arthurian Britain includes Greeks and Trojans, Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, zombies and human-animal hybrids, all while tracing the genealogies of familiar Arthurian heroes. This session will focus on language and identity in Perceforest, with papers on political dialogues; punctuation practices in manuscripts and early print editions of the text; geography and identity; and figures of widows as instrumental to the development of Britain’s proto-Christian religious identity.