IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1709: Religious Miscellanies, III: Religious Reading and Spiritual Practice

Thursday 7 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Project 'Literacy for All', University of Hull / Project 'Cities of Readers', Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Organiser:Sarah McKeon, Department of English, University of Hull
Moderator/Chair:Sabrina Corbellini, Oudere Nederlandse Letterkunde Rijksuniversiteit Groningen Oude Kijk in 't Jatstraat 26 9712 EK GRONINGEN
Paper 1709-a'In disem bůche vindet man gar schone lere von den gewaren tůgenden': 15th-Century Vernacular Religious Miscellanies Compiled for the Sisters of the Cistercian Nunnery of Lichtenthal
(Language: English)
Ulla Bucarey, Independent Scholar, München
Ulla Bucarey, Independent Scholar, München
Ulla Bucarey, Independent Scholar, München
Index terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 1709-bThe Pleasure of the Miscellany: Medical and Spiritual Reading in Late Medieval English Manuscripts
(Language: English)
Michael Leahy, School of English, University of Nottingham
Michael Leahy, School of English, University of Nottingham
Michael Leahy, School of English, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Lay Piety, Literacy and Orality, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Medicine
Paper 1709-cLooking for Jesus: Evidence for the Cult of the Holy Name in Late Medieval English Religious Miscellanies
(Language: English)
Rob Lutton, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Rob Lutton, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Rob Lutton, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Lay Piety, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Social History
Abstract

One of three linked sessions on Religious Miscellanies. Speakers explore Religious Miscellanies’s impact on and presentations of piety. Bucarey presents a case study of Lichtenthal Library MS. L 79 as example of miscellany production for designated use. Leahy argues that the blending of different fields of knowledge in Religious Miscellanies contributed to the absorption of medical terms and metaphors into the wider culture. Lutton uses the example of texts and images associated with the Holy Name of Jesus in manuscript miscellanies to explore the relevance of these collections of texts to late 14th and 15th century devotional practices.