IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1717: Objects and Objectification in the Merovingian World

Thursday 7 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:The Oxford Handbook of the Merovingian World
Organiser:Isabel Moreira, Department of History, University of Utah
Moderator/Chair:Isabel Moreira, Department of History, University of Utah
Paper 1717-aJews in the Sermons of Caesarius of Arles
(Language: English)
Lisa Bailey, Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Auckland
Lisa Bailey, Department of Classics & Ancient History, University of Auckland
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Religious Life, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 1717-bGregory of Tours and His Perception of Jews and Arians
(Language: English)
Wolfram Drews, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Wolfram Drews, Historisches Seminar, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1717-cThe Balthild Seal Matrix and the Merovingian Erotic Glance
(Language: English)
Isabel Moreira, Department of History, University of Utah
Isabel Moreira, Department of History, University of Utah
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Sexuality, Social History, Women's Studies
Abstract

Whether in the form of material objects, or in the form of objectified peoples in written sources, the Merovingian era presents the historian with images and objects that have been fashioned to promote a political representation of Christian authority and power. These images spoke to contemporary audiences in ways that can sometimes be uncovered, but which also sometimes elude interpretation. The cases examined in this session illustrate an approach that is characteristic of Christian sources in this era: to engage in a contemporary dialogue about Christian life, religion, and power (Arians, Jews, minorities, women) by casting that dialogue against the traditional and inherited forms and tropes, yet also by that means changing them. All three papers in this session present the audience with an objectified view of the less powerful individuals in society in order to explore their relationship to broadly accepted discourses of differentiation that privileged normative ideas about the locus of Christian authority and power.