IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 1718: Urban Feasting and Fasting in Central Europe

Thursday 7 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:University of South Bohemia in, České Budějovice / Central European University, Budapest
Organiser:Kateřina Horníčková, Sonderforschungsbereich 'Visions of Community', Universität Wien / University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice
Moderator/Chair:Gerhard Jaritz, Department of Medieval Studies, Central European University, Budapest
Paper 1718-aSeigneurial or Democratic?: Late Medieval Religious Urban Feasts in Southern Bohemian Towns in Comparison
(Language: English)
Kateřina Horníčková, Sonderforschungsbereich 'Visions of Community', Universität Wien / University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice
Kateřina Horníčková, Sonderforschungsbereich 'Visions of Community', Universität Wien / University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice
Index terms: Daily Life, Lay Piety, Performance Arts - General, Religious Life
Paper 1718-bTastes of Paradise: Spices in Medieval Livonian Festivals and Diplomacy
(Language: English)
Anu Mänd, School of Humanities, Tallinn University
Anu Mänd, School of Humanities, Tallinn University
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - Urban, Social History
Paper 1718-cThe Slavic Carnival in the Work of Vavřinec Leandr Rvačovský
(Language: English)
Petr Adámek, 'Faces of Community' Project, National Institute of Mental Health, Praha / University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice
Petr Adámek, 'Faces of Community' Project, National Institute of Mental Health, Praha / University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice
Index terms: Daily Life, Folk Studies, Performance Arts - General
Abstract

Symbolic communication played an important role in the urban communities of Central Europe. Urban religious and semi-religious rituals related to fasting and feasting, such as carnival, relic translations, saint patrons’ days and other festivities, functioned as a reassessment of one’s place in the urban socio-cultural stratigraphy. The session aims at evaluation of the role of these urban rituals (and the visual culture produced by it) played in the identification and presentation of the self of burghers and urban groups and networks in Central Europe.