IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 205: Mappings, I: Medieval World Maps beyond Geography

Monday 4 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Dan Terkla, Department of English, Illinois Wesleyan University
Moderator/Chair:Martina Stercken, Historisches Seminar, Universität Zürich
Paper 205-aVisualisation in Maps: How to Encrypt Storytelling and Meaning in 15th- and 16th-Century Maps
(Language: English)
Isabella Valdivieso, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Isabella Valdivieso, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Isabella Valdivieso, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Index terms: Art History - General, Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 205-bSpace, Time, and Good Fortune: The Sawley Map and Its Manuscript Context (Cambridge, Corpus Christi College, MS 66)
(Language: English)
Andrea Worm, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Andrea Worm, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Andrea Worm, Institut für Kunstgeschichte, Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Index terms: Art History - General, Geography and Settlement Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 205-cA Golden Apple in Mussa Melli's Hand?: A Study of Late Medieval World Maps of North Mediterranean Origin
(Language: English)
Gerda Brunnlechner, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Gerda Brunnlechner, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Gerda Brunnlechner, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

‘Medieval World Maps Beyond Geography’ falls under the ‘Mappings’ rubric that comprises it and another sessions in a proposed series that aims to advance studies in the history of cartography. The three papers in this session concentrate on different aspects of medieval world maps that characterise them not only as geographical representations in a modern sense. While medieval mappae mundi are showing ‘geography’ as it was known to their authors and recipients, they combine images and texts, represent world time, and interpret it on several levels of meaning, not the least a moral one.