IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 211: The Separation of Church and Church in the Carolingian Era, 8th-10th Centuries, II: Reactions and Responses

Monday 4 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Organisers:Rutger Kramer, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Graeme Ward, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Steffen Patzold, Seminar für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
Paper 211-aAmalarius of Metz, the Secular Office and Carolingian Liturgical Reform
(Language: English)
Graeme Ward, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Graeme Ward, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Liturgy, Mentalities
Paper 211-bThe ‘Apostates' of St-Denis: Monks, Canons, and the Limits of Carolingian Reform
(Language: English)
Ingrid Rembold, Hertford College, University of Oxford
Ingrid Rembold, Hertford College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Hagiography, Monasticism, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 211-cA Reformed Cult in Carolingian Brittany: The Two Lives of St Melanius of Rennes
(Language: English)
Alexandra Jordan, Department of History, Durham University
Alexandra Jordan, Department of History, Durham University
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Hagiography, Monasticism, Religious Life
Abstract

The second session of this strand considers three different local and regional responses to reform, and the role played by bishops in the implementation of the new status quo, or in the coordination of resistance to it. First, Graeme Ward will consider episcopal authority from the perspective of liturgical reform, using Amalarius of Metz’s description of the secular, non-monastic Office as a means to think about how the Carolingian reforms impacted on the liturgical practice of those not living under the authority of an abbot and according to the Rule of Benedict. Ingrid Rembold will then focus on the conflicts engendered by attempts to introduce reform in three newly-reformed communities in western Francia, and what their various resolutions may reveal about the limits of royal and episcopal authority. Finally, Alexandra Jordan’s paper offers a hagiographical perspective on the strand’s core theme, comparing and contrasting two lives of St Melanius of Rennes that were written at different moments of the 9th century, which depict Melanius in canonical and monastic contexts respectively.

N.B. This session has been organized by two people. The second is Rutger Kramer. Affiliation: Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften. Email Address: Rutger.Kramer@oeaw.ac.at