IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 225: (Re)Theorising Medieval Feast/Fast/Famine in the 21st Century, II: Eating Practices and the Value of Food in the 13th-Century Southern Low Countries

Monday 4 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS)
Organiser:Anne-Laure Méril-Bellini delle Stelle, Independent Scholar, Pissos
Moderator/Chair:Brenda M. Bolton, University of London
Paper 225-aSpilled Milk: Miscalculated Eating in the Exempla of Jacques de Vitry
(Language: English)
Stacie Vos, Department of Literature, University of California, San Diego
Stacie Vos, Department of Literature, University of California, San Diego
Stacie Vos, Department of Literature, University of California, San Diego
Index terms: Gender Studies, Hagiography, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Paper 225-bNutritional Value of Corporeal and Spiritual Food in Male Cistercian Communities: A Balance to Reach
(Language: English)
Eric Delaissé, Institut de Recherche Religions, Spiritualités, Cultures, Sociétés, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve
Eric Delaissé, Institut de Recherche Religions, Spiritualités, Cultures, Sociétés, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve
Eric Delaissé, Institut de Recherche Religions, Spiritualités, Cultures, Sociétés, Université catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve
Index terms: Gender Studies, Hagiography, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Paper 225-cReassessing and Piety: Food and Feeding among the mulieres religiosae and the viri Dei of the 13th-Century Southern Low Countries
(Language: English)
Anne-Laure Méril-Bellini delle Stelle, Independent Scholar, Pissos
Anne-Laure Méril-Bellini delle Stelle, Independent Scholar, Pissos
Anne-Laure Méril-Bellini delle Stelle, Independent Scholar, Pissos
Index terms: Gender Studies, Hagiography, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Abstract

Food was a crucial component in religious circles as a mean of livelihood, as a spiritual tool at the heart of penitential practices and as a coveted divine relic in the form of the Eucharist. Religious women appeared to nurture a special relationship with food and feeding, a relationship that perhaps provided a level of control otherwise denied women in society writ large. Through various religious sources – Vitae and exempla from sermons regarding women as well as men in the 13th-century Southern Low Countries – this session will investigate whether food was exclusively a female concern and how gendered food actually was within medieval religious circles. Comparisons between men’s and women’s experiences will therefore be drawn to explore the various ways in which both sexes interacted with food and how their eating practices were shaped by theological commitments.