IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 228: Practices and Legacies of Kingship, II: Dynastic Legacy and Legitimacy

Monday 4 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Kerstin Hundahl, Historiska Institutionen, Lunds Universitet
Moderator/Chair:Mia Münster-Swendsen, Institut for Kommunikation og Humanistisk Videnskab, Roskilde Universitet
Paper 228-aThe Problem of Paternity: Henry II of England and Geoffrey of Anjou
(Language: English)
Charity Urbanski, Department of History, University of Washington
Charity Urbanski, Department of History, University of Washington
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Historiography - Medieval, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 228-bThe Quest for Heirs: The Marriage and Kin Strategies of the Capetians between 1140 and 1240
(Language: English)
Trine Imer Kappel, Independent Scholar, København
Trine Imer Kappel, Independent Scholar, København
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 228-cValdemar II the Legislator: The Right Order of Society in Late Medieval Denmark?
(Language: English)
Michael H. Gelting, Centre for Scandinavian Studies King's College University of Aberdeen 24 High Street OLD ABERDEEN AB24 3EB
Michael H. Gelting, Centre for Scandinavian Studies King's College University of Aberdeen 24 High Street OLD ABERDEEN AB24 3EB
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session seeks to explore aspects of dynastic legacies and issues of legitimacy. The first paper examines the dynastic legacy of Henry II, whose father’s status as a mere duke posed a paternity problem to Henry’s establishment of a legitimate dynasty and how Henry addressed such a paternity issue in the commissioning of a history of the dukes of Normandy. The second paper discusses the dynastic strategies of the Capetians and the strategies employed during times of turmoil to secure succession with particular focus on the French expansion into Languedoc. The third paper explores the legacy of the Danish king Valdemar II, later known as the Victorious but whose medieval epithet was ‘the Legislator’ and examines at the factual basis for his epithets and at the later development and use of his reputation.