IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 308: The Literary Origins of Hagiography, II: How to Praise a Saint

Monday 4 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:James Corke-Webster, Department of Classics & Ancient History, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Christa Gray, Department of Classics, University of Reading
Paper 308-aPanegyric and Eusebius of Caesarea's Portrait of Constantine
(Language: English)
James Corke-Webster, Department of Classics & Ancient History, Durham University
James Corke-Webster, Department of Classics & Ancient History, Durham University
Index terms: Hagiography, Language and Literature - Greek, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 308-bPartners in Chastity: Heroic Characterisation in Latin Lives of Virgin Spouses
(Language: English)
Klazina Staat, Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, Universiteit Gent
Klazina Staat, Faculteit Letteren en Wijsbegeerte, Universiteit Gent
Index terms: Hagiography, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 308-cThe Composition of Holy Praise: Generic Textures in Late Latin Hagiography
(Language: English)
Angela Zielinski Kinney, Institut für Klassische Philologie, Mittel- und Neulatein, Universität Wien
Angela Zielinski Kinney, Institut für Klassische Philologie, Mittel- und Neulatein, Universität Wien
Index terms: Hagiography, Language and Literature - Latin, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Abstract

This panel is one of two discussing narrative texts about holy men and women from Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages. ‘How to Praise a Saint’ will explore the literary strategies used to depict heroes as exceptional and exemplary, for example by addressing the relationship between hagiography and panegyric, a genre with ancient roots that evolved throughout the Roman and mediaeval period. Papers will address well-established examples of saints’ lives but also early examples of quasi-hagiography, and even precursors to hagiography in the pre-Christian world. The panel hopes to assess how hagiography’s relationship with secular panegyric and related genres contributed to its versatility and long afterlife in the medieval world.