IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 312: The Merovingian Kingdoms in Mediterranean Perspective, III: (How) Diplomacy Matters

Monday 4 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:GIF-Project 'East and West in the Early Middle Ages - The Merovingian Kingdoms in Mediterranean Perspective', Freie Universität Berlin / Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva
Organisers:Pia Bockius, Geschichte der Spätantike und des frühen Mittelalters, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Tamar Rotman, Department of General History, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva
Moderator/Chair:Ian N. Wood, School of History, University of Leeds
Paper 312-aThe Frankish-Visigothic-Byzantine Triangle in the Late 6th Century
(Language: English)
Anna Gehler, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Anna Gehler, Friedrich-Meinecke-Institut, Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 312-bFriendship and Diplomacy in the Merovingian Kingdoms
(Language: English)
Hope Williard, University of Leeds / School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Hope Williard, University of Leeds / School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 312-cThe Religious Dimensions of 6th-Century Frankish Diplomacy
(Language: English)
Yaniv Fox, Department of General History, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan
Yaniv Fox, Department of General History, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan
Index terms: Politics and Diplomacy, Religious Life
Abstract

The third and final session examines the diplomatic aspect in the relations between the Merovingian kingdoms and other Mediterranean players. Anna Gehler will take a closer look at the political connections between the Franks, the Visigoths, and Byzantium in the late 6th century and examines their impact on developments within the kingdoms as well as on their dealings with each other. Hope Williard will discuss the function of the concept of amicitia in understanding the diplomatic relationship between the Merovingians and the Byzantines. In the last paper, Yaniv Fox will evaluate the role played by dogma in the Frankish effort to obtain a dominant political position, and how its diplomacy was designed to achieve this end.