IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 314: Poisoned Food and Poisoned Bodies in Medieval Life, Art, and Literature, II

Monday 4 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Center of Archaeometry & Applied Molecular Archaeology, Universität Salzburg / Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg / Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft
Organiser:Jan Cemper-Kiesslich, Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg
Moderator/Chair:Jan Cemper-Kiesslich, Interfakultärer Fachbereich Gerichtsmedizin und Forensische Neuropsychiatrie, Universität Salzburg
Paper 314-aSt Anthony's Fire and a Victim of Ergot Poisoning on the Isenheim Altarpiece by Matthias Grünewald
(Language: English)
Irma Trattner, Abteilung für Bildnerische Erziehung, Kunstuniversität Linz
Irma Trattner, Abteilung für Bildnerische Erziehung, Kunstuniversität Linz
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Economics - Rural, Medicine, Mentalities
Paper 314-bLike a Snake without Poison: The Stricker's Puzzling Contribution to Mental Poisoning by Sin
(Language: English)
Silvan Wagner, Lehrstuhl für Ältere Deutsche Philologie, Universität Bayreuth
Silvan Wagner, Lehrstuhl für Ältere Deutsche Philologie, Universität Bayreuth
Index terms: Language and Literature - German, Lay Piety, Mentalities
Paper 314-cThe Mysterious Death in Stories of the Eaten Heart: Did Love Poison the Last Meal of the Beloved Lady?
(Language: English)
Sieglinde Hartmann, Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft, Frankfurt am Main
Sieglinde Hartmann, Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft, Frankfurt am Main
Index terms: Language and Literature - German, Medicine, Mentalities, Religious Life
Abstract

Papers of these two sessions broadly address the theme of poisoned food and poisoned bodies in medieval life, art, and literature. Speakers aim to focus on empirical approaches to archaeological, artistic, and literary evidence in order to reconstruct ‘anatomies’ of physical and mental poisoning.The transdisciplinary approach as outlined above appears to be a promising tool not only for cross-validation of the methodologies involved but also for potentially gaining new insights into past and recent human life.