IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 321: Environmental Impacts and Societal Responses: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Pre-Modern Famines, II

Monday 4 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Heidelberg Center for the Environment, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg / Abteilung Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
Organiser:Maximilian Schuh, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Moderator/Chair:Christian Rohr, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
Paper 321-aWeather and Its Impacts on Agrarian Production in Early-14th-Century England: Evidence From the Winchester Pipe Rolls
(Language: English)
Maximilian Schuh, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Maximilian Schuh, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Maximilian Schuh, Historisches Seminar, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Index terms: Administration, Daily Life, Economics - Rural
Paper 321-bTrade, Markets, and Famine in the Territory of the Swiss Confederacy from the 14th to the 16th Centuries
(Language: English)
Chantal Camenisch, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
Chantal Camenisch, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
Chantal Camenisch, Abteilung für Wirtschafts-, Sozial- und Umweltgeschichte, Universität Bern
Index terms: Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban
Paper 321-cMonsoon Failure, Drought, and Famine in Late Mughal South Asia: Social Consequences in Bengal
(Language: English)
Dario Kaidel, Heidelberg Center for the Environment, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Dario Kaidel, Heidelberg Center for the Environment, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Dario Kaidel, Heidelberg Center for the Environment, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - Rural
Abstract

The second session on causes, courses, and consequences of famines in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period stresses trans-epochal and global perspectives. The contributions discuss evidence of weather impacts on the agrarian production in English manorial accounts, the role of trade and markets in late medieval and early modern Switzerland and the massive consequences of monsoon failure and draught for late Mughal South Asia. Combining the different perspectives presented in the two sessions aims at improving the general understanding of famines in premodern societies as common features as well as specific differences can be identified.