IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 328: Practices and Legacies of Kingship, III: Propaganda and Papal Involvement

Monday 4 July 2016, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Kerstin Hundahl, Historiska Institutionen, Lunds Universitet
Moderator/Chair:Sally N. Vaughn, Department of History, University of Houston, Texas
Paper 328-aKing Offa's Genes in the Papal Archive: A Lost Royal Legacy
(Language: English)
Benjamin Savill, Wolfson College, University of Oxford
Benjamin Savill, Wolfson College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Genealogy and Prosopography, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 328-bDefaming Kings and Stirring Scandal: Excommunication as Propaganda in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Felicity Hill, School of History, University of East Anglia
Felicity Hill, School of History, University of East Anglia
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 328-cPapal Involvement and Propaganda in the Danish Battle for the Throne in the Mid-13th Century
(Language: English)
Kerstin Hundahl, Historiska Institutionen, Lunds Universitet
Kerstin Hundahl, Historiska Institutionen, Lunds Universitet
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session explores ways in which the papacy and propaganda played a role in European kingship.The first paper investigates one of the earliest instances of royal property being passed down along a “genealogical” line with papal approval, namely that of Offa of Mercia and explores the implications the concept of genealogia had in a wider European context. The second paper will explore the way in which the Church used the threat or sentence of excommunication to disseminate negative publicity against their enemies, and how thirteenth-century kings reacted to this. The third paper examines the importance of papal involvement during the political conflicts of the mid-13th century in Denmark and the role the papacy played in the creation of propaganda and legitimacy.