IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 510: Social Networks of Clergy in Late Antiquity, I

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Project 'Presbyters in the Late Antique West', Uniwersytet Warszawski
Organiser:Robert Wiśniewski, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Moderator/Chair:Robert Wiśniewski, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Paper 510-aRivalry between Presbyters and Deacons in the Roman Church: The Witness of Ambrosiaster, De iactantia Romanorum levitarum (Q. 101)
(Language: English)
David Hunter, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky
David Hunter, Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of Kentucky
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Liturgy, Social History
Paper 510-bCompetition within Clergy in Late Antique Epigraphic Evidence
(Language: English)
Isabelle Mossong, Kommission für Alte Geschichte und Epigraphik, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, München
Isabelle Mossong, Kommission für Alte Geschichte und Epigraphik, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, München
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Epigraphy, Social History
Paper 510-c'Tam grande scandalum': Concilium Arelatense in Causa Fausti, and the Dispute over the Right to Ordain Clerics - The Insight into the Relationships between Monastic and Non-Monastic Clergymen?
(Language: English)
Jerzy Szafranowski, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Jerzy Szafranowski, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Index terms: Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism
Abstract

Late antique clerics did not act in a social void. They had friends, partners, allies, patrons, and enemies. These two sessions will examine relations which linked bishops, presbyters, and deacons with lay people, women, heretics, monks, and other members of the clergy, in different regions of Christendom in c. 300-600. While analysing normative texts, narratives, theological treatises, inscriptions, and particularly letters the speakers will seek to explain the range, strength, and character of personal and institutional contacts as well as the mechanisms which helped to establish, maintain, and sometimes break them up.