IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 516: Myth and Identity in Medieval Britain: Nation, History, Politics

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Medieval & Early Modern Research Initiative, Cardiff University
Organiser:Victoria Shirley, School of English, Communication & Philosophy, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair:Melissa Julian-Jones, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Paper 516-aGerald of Wales and the Trojan Britons in Ireland
(Language: English)
Diarmuid Scully, School of History, University College Cork
Diarmuid Scully, School of History, University College Cork
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin
Paper 516-bHengist and the Foundation of England in the Galfridian Chronicle Tradition
(Language: English)
Victoria Shirley, School of English, Communication & Philosophy, Cardiff University
Victoria Shirley, School of English, Communication & Philosophy, Cardiff University
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Comparative
Paper 516-cMacduff, Thane of Fife, and the Mythologisation of the Scottish Past in Andrew of Wyntoun's Orygynale Cronykil
(Language: English)
Marian Toledo Candelaria, Centre for Scottish Studies, University of Guelph
Marian Toledo Candelaria, Centre for Scottish Studies, University of Guelph
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Other
Abstract

This panel will consider how myths were used to construct different national identities in medieval Britain. The first paper will address how Gerald of Wales represents the Britons as Trojans in his Expugnatio hibernica, demonstrating how this classical myth was used to legitimate the English conquest of Ireland in the late 12th century. The second paper will examine how 13th- and 14th-century chroniclers assimilated the story of Hengist and the foundation of England into a wider narrative of ‘British’ history. The final paper will consider the role of Macduff in Andrew of Wyntoun’s Orygynale Cronykil, discussing how the murder of Macbeth and the ascension of King Malcolm were re-written during the 15th century from a localized perspective that emphasized the political agency of the Thane of Fife.