IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 522: 'Schützenfest' Meets 'Hochzeitsbrauch': Medieval (South) German Feasts and Their Modern Adaptations

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (ZEMAS), Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Organiser:Ingrid Bennewitz, Lehrstuhl für Deutsche Philologie des Mittelalters, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Moderator/Chair:Ingrid Bennewitz, Lehrstuhl für Deutsche Philologie des Mittelalters, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Paper 522-aMilitary Exercise or Folk Festival?: Schützenfests in Southern Germany during the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Christian Chandon, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte / Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (ZEMAS), Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Christian Chandon, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte / Zentrum für Mittelalterstudien (ZEMAS), Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Index terms: Daily Life, Law, Mentalities, Social History
Paper 522-bAdaptations of Late Medieval Princely Wedding Feasts: Historiographical Rewriting and Modern Re-Enactment
(Language: English)
Matthias Herm, Historisches Seminar, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Matthias Herm, Historisches Seminar, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 522-cDangerous Meals and Dangerous Feasts in Medieval Literature and Their Adaptation in Modern Film
(Language: English)
Ingrid Bennewitz, Lehrstuhl für Deutsche Philologie des Mittelalters, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Ingrid Bennewitz, Lehrstuhl für Deutsche Philologie des Mittelalters, Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg
Index terms: Anthropology, Language and Literature - German, Mentalities, Social History
Abstract

Religious and secular festivities formed an important part of life in the Middle Ages. They provided not only leisure and enjoyment to the population but also fulfilled an important social role. Festivities were as important to the ruler as to the people, we know about glorious courtly festivities by grand rulers as well of ‘ordinary’ weddings and baptism by urban people or even so-called ‘Schützenfeste‘ (kind of marksmen’s festival) as a specific kind of folk festival in Germany. Meals and feasts were also an integral part of medieval literature to consolidate social order, but also to expose its problems as in the well-known example of the Hun’s feast in the Nibelungenlied. This session wants to focus the role of these different festivities for medieval authorities and society as well as their discussion in medieval literature and their adaption in the modern film.