IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 526: From West Frankish Carolingians to French Capetians, I: Frameworks of Contention

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Geoffrey Koziol, Department of History, University of California, Berkeley
Moderator/Chair:Geoffrey Koziol, Department of History, University of California, Berkeley
Paper 526-aThe King and the Count: Charles the Simple and Hagano - Thoughts on the Limits of Royal Power in the Early 10th Century
(Language: English)
Horst Lößlein, Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Histoire, Histoire de l’Art et Musicologie, Université de Limoges / Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Horst Lößlein, Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Histoire, Histoire de l’Art et Musicologie, Université de Limoges / Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 526-b'Contentions Arising': The Thibaudines and Hugh Capet, 956-995
(Language: English)
Fraser McNair, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge
Fraser McNair, Pembroke College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Local History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 526-cThe Giveaway Bride: Bertrada of Montfort and the End of King Philip I of Francia's Carolingian 'Renovatio'
(Language: English)
Matthew Gabriele, Department of Religion & Culture, Virginia Tech
Matthew Gabriele, Department of Religion & Culture, Virginia Tech
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy, Religious Life
Abstract

Whether one looks at histories or charters, ‘France’ in the 11th century under the first Capetians looks different from the ‘West Frankish’ kingdom in the 10th century under the last Carolingians. Why? Did something fundamental change in the structures of power? Or did histories and charters simply develop a new language that masked real continuity in structures? In this first of two linked panels, presenters will examine three cases of conflict from the beginning, middle, and end of the period to determine whether and how the sources and patterns of conflict between kings and elites changed.