IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 612: Languages and Literacy in the Early Medieval West, II: New Perspectives on Anglo-Saxon Multilingualism

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Project 'The Languages of Early Medieval Charters', Universidad del País Vasco
Organisers:Edward Roberts, Department of History, University of Liverpool / Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco
Francesca Tinti, Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de América, Universidad del País Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Vitoria-Gasteiz
Moderator/Chair:Elizabeth M. Tyler, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Paper 612-aAnglo-Latin Bilingualism before 1066: Going beyond Limitations
(Language: English)
Olga Timofeeva, Englisches Seminar, Universität Zürich
Olga Timofeeva, Englisches Seminar, Universität Zürich
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Paper 612-bAnother Day, Another Alphabet: Bilingualism in Runica Manuscripta
(Language: English)
Aya van Renterghem, Centre for the Study of the Viking Age / School of English, University of Nottingham
Aya van Renterghem, Centre for the Study of the Viking Age / School of English, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Literacy and Orality, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 612-cThe Languages of Money in Early Medieval England and Its Neighbours
(Language: English)
Rory Naismith, Department of History, King's College London
Rory Naismith, Department of History, King's College London
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Latin, Literacy and Orality, Numismatics
Abstract

In the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds, Latin was not the language of everyday speech; it needed to be learned as a second or foreign language. Multilingual and vernacular texts from these regions thus enable us to pose questions about literacy, the relationship between written and oral communication, language choice, and code-switching. The papers in this second session examine new approaches to the study of English-Latin contact and bilingualism in pre-Conquest England, the implications of the appearance of Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian runes in Latin manuscripts, and the significance of language choice in early medieval coin inscriptions.