IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 616: Food and Health in Early Byzantine and Rabbinic Sources

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art & Culture, Hellenic College, Holy Cross, Massachussetts
Organiser:Christine F. Salazar, Institut für Klassische Philologie, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin
Moderator/Chair:Caroline Musgrove, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Paper 616-aTelling Women What to Eat: Instruction and Agency in Oribasius' Medical Collections
(Language: English)
Caroline Musgrove, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Caroline Musgrove, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Gender Studies, Medicine
Paper 616-bPaul of Aegina on the Properties of Fruit and Vegetables: Tradition and Creativity
(Language: English)
Christine F. Salazar, Institut für Klassische Philologie, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin
Christine F. Salazar, Institut für Klassische Philologie, Humboldt-Universität, Berlin
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Medicine
Paper 616-cThe Dynamics of Diet and Regimen: Talmudic Appropriation and Domestication of a Genre?
(Language: English)
Lennart Lehmhaus, Sonderforschungsbereich 980 'Episteme in Bewegung', Freie Universität Berlin
Lennart Lehmhaus, Sonderforschungsbereich 980 'Episteme in Bewegung', Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Medicine
Abstract

Works about regimen – proper nutrition, care of the body, and physical exercise – form a distinct genre in the corpus of Greek medical writings from as early as the 5th century BCE. The tradition is appropriated and re-organised in the early Byzantine medical encyclopaedias (Oribasius, Aetius of Amida and Paul of Aegina) and spread throughout the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Research suggests that most of the Mediterranean Jews espoused and adapted Graeco-Roman socio-cultural values and practices. This panel aims to examine the transfer, appropriation, and/or transformation of Greek medical theories or practices by comparing early Byzantine and rabbinic writings.