IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 619: Eating and Being Eaten by God, I: The Imagery of Food and Drink in Mystical Writings in the Later Middle Ages

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Mystical Theology Network (MTN) / Instituut voor de Studie van Spiritualiteit, KU Leuven
Organiser:Rob Faesen, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Moderator/Chair:Louise Nelstrop, St Benet's Hall, University of Oxford / Sarum College, Salisbury
Paper 619-aDrunkenness and Bulimia in Margaret Porete and John of Ruusbroec
(Language: English)
John Arblaster, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
John Arblaster, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Dutch, Theology
Paper 619-bThe Taste of the Divinized Body in the Mulieres religiosae
(Language: English)
Sander Vloebergs, Faculteit Theologie en Religiewetenschappen, KU Leuven
Sander Vloebergs, Faculteit Theologie en Religiewetenschappen, KU Leuven
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Dutch, Theology
Paper 619-c'Through Eating, Tasting, and Seeing Interiorly': Hadewijch on Love's Most Intimate Union (Poem in Couplets 16)
(Language: English)
Rob Faesen, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Rob Faesen, Institute for the Study of Spirituality, KU Leuven / Ruusbroecgenootschap, Universiteit Antwerpen
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Dutch, Theology
Abstract

This session considers the spiritual meaning of eating and drinking within the thought of medieval Christian mystics, especially from the Low Countries. The papers explore how ideas such as ‘becoming God’ deification and union with God have been expressed in motifs and images related to eating and drinking, and how these images express unconventional theological ways of understanding the relation between God and the human person.