IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 633: Gender, Authority, and Expertise in Medicine of the Iberian Peninsula

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:American Association of Research Historians of Medieval Spain
Organiser:Iona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Elena Woodacre, Department of History, University of Winchester
Paper 633-a'Listen and know on the retention of menstrual blood': Writing in Hebrew on Female Physiology and Disease in Christian Castile at the Turn of the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Carmen Caballero-Navas, Departamento de Estudios Semíticos, Universidad de Granada
Carmen Caballero-Navas, Departamento de Estudios Semíticos, Universidad de Granada
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Language and Literature - Spanish or Portuguese, Medicine, Women's Studies
Paper 633-bTransforming Trota into Trotula: Female Authority and Female Authorship in Catalan Medical Texts
(Language: English)
Montserrat Cabré Pairet, Departamento de Fisología y Farmacología, Universidad de Cantabria
Montserrat Cabré Pairet, Departamento de Fisología y Farmacología, Universidad de Cantabria
Index terms: Language and Literature - Spanish or Portuguese, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Medicine, Women's Studies
Paper 633-cHealth, Diet, and Masculinity: The Male 'Patient' in Late Medieval Portugal
(Language: English)
Iona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Iona McCleery, Institute for Medieval Studies / School of History, University of Leeds
Index terms: Daily Life, Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Spanish or Portuguese, Medicine
Abstract

This session will draw on current research to investigate issues of the transmission of knowledge and expertise of the human body and its medical treatment across the Iberian Peninsula between c. 1200 and c. 1500. Papers range from an analysis of Arabic, Hebrew and Latin traditions of gynaecology circulating in Castile and Provence, through to neglected aspects of male dietary health and wound treatment in Portuguese chronicles, miracle stories and medical writings, via an investigation of how female authority was represented in Catalan medical texts attributed to the famous female practitioner Trota or entitled Trotula.