IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 634: Gender at the Intersection of the Secular and Sacred in Literature

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:St Andrews Gender & Transgression Conference
Organiser:Lydia Hayes, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Moderator/Chair:Victoria Turner, School of Modern Languages - French, University of St Andrews
Paper 634-aDefrocking a Female Bishop: The French Lives of St Martha
(Language: English)
Huw Grange, Faculty of Medieval & Modern Languages, University of Oxford
Huw Grange, Faculty of Medieval & Modern Languages, University of Oxford
Index terms: Gender Studies, Hagiography, Language and Literature - French or Occitan
Paper 634-bHoly and Transgressive Women in Gardens: A Literary Perspective
(Language: English)
Lydia Hayes, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Lydia Hayes, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Biblical Studies, Gender Studies, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Women's Studies
Paper 634-cThree Men and a Baby: How Gendered was Foster-Fatherhood within and without the Monastery?
(Language: English)
Thomas O'Donnell, Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London
Thomas O'Donnell, Department of Science & Technology Studies, University College London
Index terms: Gender Studies, Hagiography, Language and Literature - Celtic, Monasticism
Abstract

One of the many ways in which to conceptualise the relationship between the secular and sacred in medieval literature is to examine it through the lens of gender; specifically, looking at the identification and function of gender and gender roles in both forms of literature. The first paper in this session examines responses to Martha’s holy transvestism in three French lives of the saint; the second looks at the relationship between gender and space, comparing representations of women in gardens in French Arthurian literature to those in biblical commentaries; and the third paper examines the ways in which hagiographers in 12th-century Ireland presented their saints in the role of foster father.