IMC 2016: Sessions

Session 708: Writing in Context

Tuesday 5 July 2016, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Onderzoekschool Mediëvistiek
Organiser:Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Moderator/Chair:Rob Meens, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Paper 708-a'Pray for me, John, priest, miserable sinner': Devotional Graffiti as a Source for Understanding Devotion and Conceptions of Intercession in the Early Medieval West
(Language: English)
Becca Grose, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Becca Grose, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Lay Piety, Literacy and Orality, Religious Life
Paper 708-bStudying History in 9th-Century Auxerre: Marginal Annotations on Justinus's Epitome of Pompeius Trogus's Historia
(Language: English)
Lenneke Van Raaij, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Lenneke Van Raaij, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
Index terms: Literacy and Orality, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 708-cComparative Medieval Translation Study, 1100-1500: New Theoretical Perspectives and an Analysis of a Multilingual Narrative Tradition - An Interdisciplinary Approach
(Language: English)
Arend Elias Oostindiër, Faculteit der Letteren, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Arend Elias Oostindiër, Faculteit der Letteren, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Literacy and Orality, Rhetoric
Abstract

This session, sponsored by the Onderzoekschool Mediëvistiek, investigates three different ways of writing: writing on objects (graffiti), writing in the margins of books, and finally translating. The study of orality and literacy has received a lot of attention from (literary) historians. Most of this research is based on an analysis of literary texts or documentary evidence. In this session other uses of writing are discussed, which have been more or less neglected in recent research. These different kinds of writing reveal different perceptions of language, texts and identity, that will be discussed in the three papers covering a broad chronological range.